Egyptian AK47 Rifle Overview

Semi automatic AKM rifles were / are imported from Egypt. The factory was shipped to Egypt lock, stock, and barrel from Russia. The Russian’s set up….
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
Egyptian AK47 Rifle Overview

Semi automatic AKM rifles were/are imported from Egypt. These rifles are mfg. by the Maadi Co. for Engineering Industries Maadi-Cairo,Egypt. The factory was shipped to Egypt lock,stock,and barrel from Russia. The Russian’s set up the factory for the Egyptians after they got there arab butts kicked by the jews in the 60′s. The pre 1989 ban rifles were only imported by Styer. The post ban rifles were imported by ACC/INTRAC of Knoxville,TN, Pars International Corp. of Louisville,KY and Century Arms International of St. Albins,Vermont.

ACC/INTRAC imported the models ARM and RPM only. The model ARM has a 16″ barrel that is threaded with a muzzle nut spot welded on. The model RPM has a 20″ barrel that is threaded with a muzzle nut tack welded on. Both models have a laminated thumbhole stock with a metal buttplate and a spring loaded trap for storing the cleaning kit. Both upper and lower handguards are laminated. Almost all of these rifle had the 2 digit mfg./import date stamped on the side of the rear sight. The model RPM rifles have the same diameter barrel as the model ARM just 4″ longer. On both models the finish on the metal parts is black paint. Both models came with the cleaning rods attached under the barrel, 1-5rd mag,dark green cotton sling, owners manual,and a final inspection certificate.

Semi automatic AKM rifles were/are imported from Egypt. These rifles are mfg. by the Maadi Co. for Engineering Industries Maadi-Cairo,Egypt. The factory was shipped to Egypt lock,stock,and barrel from Russia. The Russian's set up the factory for the Egyptians after they got there arab butts kicked by the jews in the 60's. The pre 1989 ban rifles were only imported by Styer. The post ban rifles were imported by ACC/INTRAC of Knoxville,TN, Pars International Corp. of Louisville,KY and Century Arms International of St. Albins,Vermont.

ACC/INTRAC imported the models ARM and RPM only. The model ARM has a 16

Pars International Corp. imported the ARM and RML model rifles. The model RML came in 2 barrel lengths 16″ and 20″. The ARM was imported with 16″ barrels only. In the top picture is the 16″ barreled late import model RML. The lower picture is of a early import 20″ barreled RML. The early imports of RML rifles had threaded barrels and the 20″ barreled model had a bipod attached. The later imported RML rifles had the threads turned off the end of the barrel and the 20″ barreled rifle didn’t have a bipod. The later import ARM and RML rifles were advertised in the Shotgun News as being “California Legal”. This was because of the ban the state of California passed on threaded barrels on semi automatic rifles. Barrel diameters were the same for all Maadi regardless of the model or length. ARM and RML rifles were imported with 5rd mag,cleaning kit,cleaning rod,manual,sling, and certificate. All ARM and RML rifles were imported with laminated thumbhole stocks and handguards. They have metal buttplates with the trap for the cleaning kit.

Century Arms International imported the Maadi model MISR and stripped Maadi receivers. The MISR was a 16

Century Arms International imported the Maadi model MISR and stripped Maadi receivers. The MISR was a 16″ barreled rifle that had the threads turned off the end of the barrel. It was just like the PARS 16″ barreled rifle except for the markings. The stripped receivers that they imported some were sold as is but most were used to make MISR-90 rifles. The model MISR-90 was a Maadi receiver that had all other parts from a Chinese MAK-90 added to make a complete rifle. A large quantity of MAK-90 rifles were disassembled and all the parts sold as a kit after the import ban of Chinese rifles/parts/ammo in 1994. The first batch of MISR-90 rifles assembled looked like a piece of crap. The Chinese AK rifles have a smaller diameter barrel shank that is pressed into the barrel trunion in the receiver than the Russian/Euro pattern rifles of which a Maadi is. A sleeve was needed to attached the Chinese barrel to the Maadi receiver. The first rifles looked like these were installed with a hammer instead of a press. later rifles look Ok but the painted black Maadi receiver looks kinda funny with all the other parts of the rifle being blued.

After the 1998 import ban on semi automatic rifles with large capacity magazines(over 10 rds) passed the MISR-10 was imported. This was the same as the MISR except it was mfg. to use only a single stack 5rd and/or 10rd magazines. Alot of these rifles were modified to use high capacity magazines and US mfg. parts added to be legal.

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Pre / Post Ban Chinese AK47 Rifle Overview

AK type rifles were imported from the People Republic of China (PRC) till imports were cut off in May of 1994. They were…
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
Pre & Post Ban Chinese AK47 Rifle Overview

AK type rifles were imported from the People Republic of China (PRC) till imports were cut off in May of 1994. They were imported in 2 calibers 7.62x39mm and 5.56x45mm / 223 Remington. A very few samples were imported in 5.45x39mm but were snapped up by collectors so the chances of seeing one are pretty slim.

PRE BAN RIFLES
Rifles imported before the ban was enacted in July of 1989 are commonly referred to as “pre ban”. They can have all the evil features of a assault rifle that is defined by the BATF as: (B) a semiautomatic rifle that has an ability to accept a detachable magazine and has at least 2 of – (i) a folding or telescopic stock; (ii) a pistol grip that protrudes conspicuously beneath the action of the weapon; (iii) a bayonet mount; (iv) a flash suppressor or threaded barrel designed to accommodate a flash suppressor; and (v) a grenade launcher;

This above is from the BATF website

There were about two dozen importers of pre ban rifles and almost half of them went out of business when the 1989 ban went into effect.

POST BAN RIFLES
AK type rifles that were imported from 1990 till imports of Chinese rifles were cut off in May of 1994 are commonly referred to as “post ban rifles”. They can be identified by the model number stamped on the receiver or barrel trunnion and 2 digit year of import prefix or suffix to the serial number. The model numbers of post ban rifles are: MAK-90,MAK-91,NHM-90,NHM-91,BWK-92,and Hunter.

MAK-90

AK type rifles that were imported from 1990 till imports of Chinese rifles were cut off in May of 1994 are commonly referred to as

MAK-90 stands for Modified AK rifle-model of 1990. They were import with milled and stamped receivers. Here is a picture of a stamped (top) and milled receivers.

Notice the rivets on the stamped receiver that hold the barrel trunnion and rear trunnion in the receiver. The milled receiver lacks rivets as it is one piece of steel. Notice the milled out spot on the front of it. These rifles have a 16″ barrel with the threads turned off the end of the barrel. They were imported in 7.62x39mm and 5.56x45mm(223) calibers.

The MAK-90 rifles in 5.56 caliber use a different mag than the 7.62x39mm rifles. The MAK-90 5.56 rifles use a magazine that is commonly referred to as the Norinco type. As it is the same one used by the pre ban Norinco rifles and is different from the one used by the Poly Tech 5.56 rifles. Here is a picture of a 7.62x39mm mag next to a Norinco 223 mag. Notice how the 223 mag has less curve to it than the 7.62 mag.

The only MAK-90 rifles with a threaded barrel are the stamped receiver rifles imported early in 1990. They were pre ban rifles that were still in customs when the ban went into effect and had to be modified to meet post ban rifle specs, I.E. thumbhole stocks added, bayonet lug ground down, and some but not all had the muzzle nut tack welded on. Here is a picture of pre ban rifle that was caught in customs and changed to post ban specs, notice how it has been re-stamped. The other picture is of a rifle with the original model name ground off and restamped MAK-90 Sporter.

These rifles had thumbhole stocks of Chinese mfg. that were fastened to the receiver by the screws on the tang and a pistol grip bolt and nut. They had the standard pistol grip nut but had the pistol grip bolt was shortened. Notice how the MAK-90 thumbhole stocks pistol grip (right) is shorter than standard AK pistol grip (center) and both are shorter than the NHM-90 thumbhole stock (left). This is the reason for shortening the pistol grip bolt.

These rifles had thumbhole stocks of Chinese mfg. that were fastened to the receiver by the screws on the tang and a pistol grip bolt and nut. They had the standard pistol grip nut but had the pistol grip bolt was shortened. Notice how the MAK-90 thumbhole stocks pistol grip (right) is shorter than standard AK pistol grip (center) and both are shorter than the NHM-90 thumbhole stock (left). This is the reason for shortening the pistol grip bolt.

Here is a picture of MAK-90 stocks notice the one in the center is darker and has a solid recoil pad but all are of Chinese mfg.

Here is a picture of MAK-90 stocks notice the one in the center is darker and has a solid recoil pad but all are of Chinese mfg.

All of the early imported MAK-90 rifles had the original model number ground off the barrel trunnion and re-stamped MAK-90. Looking close you can see the grinder marks on this rifle.

A very few of these early imports had under folding stocks still attached and folded. A tang was welded onto the rear of the receiver to attach the thumbhole stock. With the thumbhole stock attached it prevented the under folding stock from being unfolded. The stamped receiver MAK-90 rifles came with thumbhole stocks colored from light to dark. The MAK-90 rifles were imported with some rifles stamped

A very few of these early imports had under folding stocks still attached and folded. A tang was welded onto the rear of the receiver to attach the thumbhole stock. With the thumbhole stock attached it prevented the under folding stock from being unfolded. The stamped receiver MAK-90 rifles came with thumbhole stocks colored from light to dark. The MAK-90 rifles were imported with some rifles stamped “sporter” on the left side of the receiver.

Some of the rifles imported in early 1990 didn't have the 2 digit date of import stamped on them. But most Chinese rifles imported had (x=serial numbers) 90,91,92,93,94 prefix or suffix. This was done with a dash, space, or just stamped as part of the serial number. Prefixes were marked as follows 91-xxxxxx,91(space)xxxxxx,or 91xxxxxx. Suffixes were the same xxxxxx-91,xxxxxx(space)91,xxxxxx91.

Some of the rifles imported in early 1990 didn’t have the 2 digit date of import stamped on them. But most Chinese rifles imported had (x=serial numbers) 90,91,92,93,94 prefix or suffix. This was done with a dash, space, or just stamped as part of the serial number. Prefixes were marked as follows 91-xxxxxx,91(space)xxxxxx,or 91xxxxxx. Suffixes were the same xxxxxx-91,xxxxxx(space)91,xxxxxx91.

There was also a Poly Tech stamped receiver rifle imported that was stamped MAK-90 and imported by KBI. This blows the notion that only Kengs Firearms Specialties(KFS) imported Poly Tech rifles. It had a 16″ barrel with the threads turned off the end and bayonet lug ground down. Notice the ground down spot that is re-stamped “MAK-90 SPORTER”.

There was also a Poly Tech stamped receiver rifle imported that was stamped MAK-90 and imported by KBI. This blows the notion that only Kengs Firearms Specialties(KFS) imported Poly Tech rifles. It had a 16

Milled receiver MAK-90/MAK-91

Both rifles had the threads turned off the end of the barrel and bayonet lug ground down. They were only imported in 7.62x39mm caliber. The MAK-90 has a 16

MAK-90

Both rifles had the threads turned off the end of the barrel and bayonet lug ground down. They were only imported in 7.62x39mm caliber. The MAK-90 has a 16

MAK-91

Both rifles had the threads turned off the end of the barrel and bayonet lug ground down. They were only imported in 7.62x39mm caliber. The MAK-90 has a 16″ barrel and the MAK-91 has a 19″ heavy barrel. Measured between the gas block and front sight the barrel of the MAK-91 is .685″ in diameter which is the largest diameter barrel on any post ban AK type rifle imported. Both came with a dark brown Chinese thumbhole stock with black recoil pad and white line spacer. They are both stamped 386 in a oval on the trunnion which is the same factory that Poly Tech rifles were mfg. in. The MAK-91 has NM stamped under the factory stamp and serial number as you can see in the picture about serial numbers.

The stamping NATIONAL MATCH is also on the side of the receiver.

On the right side of the receiver are 3 Chinese letters which translate as “precision degree gun”.
All of the above pictures of markings on the MAK-91 are also on the Poly Tech Legend National Match rifle. IS the MAK-91 a post ban PTLNM rifle? All the markings are there. Both these milled receiver rifles have the best trigger pull of any AK type rifle ever imported to the US. I have fired 6 MAK-90 and 2 MAK-91 rifles and all have fantastic trigger pulls.

NHM-90

All of the above pictures of markings on the MAK-91 are also on the Poly Tech Legend National Match rifle. IS the MAK-91 a post ban PTLNM rifle? All the markings are there. Both these milled receiver rifles have the best trigger pull of any AK type rifle ever imported to the US. I have fired 6 MAK-90 and 2 MAK-91 rifles and all have fantastic trigger pulls.

They were imported in and calibers. Stamped receivers with 16″ barrels that were threaded with a muzzle nut tack welded on. The muzzle nut looked like piece of pipe 2 to 3 inches long. The. They were made by Bishop or Boyd of hackberry wood. Which ever company mfg. the stock can be seen by their name imprinted on the black plastic butt plate.

These thumbhole stocks are the most comfortable ones on any post ban Chinese rifle imported. They are attached to the rifle by screw through the tang on the top of the thumbhole stock and a pistol grip screw and nut. The pistol grip screw is longer than the standard AK pistol grip screw.

These thumbhole stocks are the most comfortable ones on any post ban Chinese rifle imported. They are attached to the rifle by screw through the tang on the top of the thumbhole stock and a pistol grip screw and nut. The pistol grip screw is longer than the standard AK pistol grip screw.

Quite a lot of the NHM-90 rifles imported had under folding stock receivers. The holes in each side of the receiver were covered by a steel plate that were held on by a rivet. A long rivet passed through the receiver and held the plates on. The rear of the receiver was closed up and a tang was added to attach the thumbhole stock. The 223 caliber rifles use the same magazines as the MAK-90 rifles.

NHM-91

They were imported in 7.62x39mm and 5.56x45mm(223) calibers. The 223 caliber rifles are pretty rare as very small numbers were imported. All had stamped receivers and 20″ heavy barrels with a short muzzle nut tack welded on.

The early imported rifles had the folding bipod with adjustable legs attached but later imports had it unattached in the box. The bipod has a thumbscrew on each leg that allow the legs to be adjusted for length. The only problem with them is that you just can’t tighten the thumbscrew up enough with hand to keep it from loosing up and the leg collapsing during firing.

NHM-91 rifles came with a rivet where the rear tang of the magazine hits the receiver when the mag catch holds it in the rifle. I had to hold the mag catch lever back to get the picture. In the picture the arrow shows where I ground down the head of the rivet, it is the shiny spot.

The magazines that came with these rifles had the tang milled out to clear the rivet when it was inserted into the rifle. Here is a picture of a 5rd and 10rd mag that came with one of my rifles. Modified 30rd magazines also came with these rifles but most were removed from the box by dealers sorry bastards) for sale separate at a higher price than standard 30rd magazines.

The rivet was not required by law or any import rules it was just something that was done by the mfg. or importer. Removal of it breaks no laws or anything else. I have seen NHM-91 rifles new in the box with the rivet in tight, loose, installed but not riveted, and missing. This rivet has no function other than to prevent the use of regular AK magazines that are not milled out to clear it.

Stocks on the NHM-91 were the same as the NHM-90,mfg. by Bishop or Boyd. But some were made of birch wood but were the same pattern as the hackberry one.

BWK-92

The BWK-92 was mfg. in China by Norinco and imported B-west. Unlike the B-west rifles with Chinese parts and US mfg. receivers that had heat treating problems they are 100% made in China. It came only in 5.56x45mm/223 and used the same Norinco pattern magazines as the MAK-90/NHM-90. It has a 16″ unthreaded barrel and had the same thumbhole stocks as MAK-90 rifles.

These rifles were also imported by A.C.

Norinco Hunter

The Hunter rifle has a milled receiver that is marked with a 386 in a oval. This is the same factory stamp as the Poly Tech rifles and denotes that they were made in factory #386 located in Shenzhen,China. The barrel is 20″ long and doesn’t have threads on the end for a muzzle brake. This rifle is while not a exact copy of the Valmet Hunter M-88 is copied from it.

For ease of identification I have classed the rifle into 3 types based on the type of rear sight it has.

  • Type I = peep sight mounted on the receiver cover.
  • Type II = two leaf folding notch sight mounted on the rear sight block.
  • Type III = standard type AK rear sight.

There were 3 holes on the left side of the receiver above the mag well for the detachable scope mount. Not all rifles were drilled and tapped for a scope mount.

Type I

The first type had a peep sight on rear of the receiver cover. The receiver cover had a small ear on each side that hung down over the receiver. It had a hole in it that a screw went through and into the receiver. This was to hold the receiver cover to the receiver so that it would be in the same position each time it was removed for cleaning. It had a sliding mag release that looks like the one on the SKS rifle. The rifles that had the scope mount used a scope mounting plate that fastened to the receiver with 3 screws. The scope mount fastened to the mounting plate with 2 large knurled thumb screw. This rifle had long trigger.

The trigger was mounted in the same place in the receiver as a standard AK rifle but it was very long with a long trigger guard. This was done so it could be reached with the sporting rifle type stock it has.

Type II

The second type Hunter rifle that I refer to as the Type II is pictured here new in the box.

It has a L shaped notched rear sight that can be flipped from the shorter 100 meter notch to the taller part of the L that has a 300 meter notch. The rear sight is in the same position as standard AK-47 rifle.

Here is the rear sight with 300 meter side flipped up.

It has the same sliding mag release as the type I rifle. Just like the type I some were drilled and tapped for the scope mount and some not. The scope mount for this rifle didn’t have the knurled thumb screw. It was attached to the scope mounting plate by 2 screws. It had the same long trigger as the Type I. Also the same sliding type mag release as type I.

Type III

The third type rifle had a standard sliding rear sight as a AK-47 rifle. The mag release was the same lever type as the standard AK-47 rifle. The trigger was in a position farther back on the receiver but looked like the standard AK rifle trigger. It was modified on the inside to be longer so it would work with the hammer and disconector that are in the position as the other types of Hunter rifles and standard AK rifles.

There are transition Hunter rifles as I have seen pictures of type II rifle with type III mag release. I have recently received some pics of a Type I rifle rifle marked “HUNTER 90″ with the same type front sight mounted on the gas block just like the Valmet Hunter M-88 rifle.

But about 98% of Hunter rifles fall into the Type I, II, or III categories.

Poly Tech Post Ban Rifles

Besides the above mentioned Poly Tech MAK-90 Sporter there was also a rifle imported by Kengs Firearms Specialties (KFS). These rifles have all the standard type Poly Tech markings with the addition of two letters “sp” stamped on the left side of the receiver above the mag well. The “sp” is a silver color because it was stamped on the receiver after the rifle was imported. They have 16″ barrels that are threaded with a muzzle nut tack welded on. They have Choate black plastic thumbhole stocks and hand guards.

The “sp” rifles are pre ban rifles that were not released from customs before the 1989 ban went into effect. Kengs filed a law suit to have the rifles released from customs in 1989. It was in court and the rifles sat in customs for 7 years. In 1996 Kengs won the law suit to have the rifles released from customs. But part of the court order was that the rifles were now post ban and had to be modified to post ban specs to be released from customs. This confirmed the precedence that the import date of rifles is not when they come into this country but when released from customs. The bayonet lugs were ground down, muzzle nuts tack welded, and Choate thumbhole stock set applied.

Sile Post Ban rifles

Post ban rifles were imported by Sile in New York, New York. They were pre ban 56S rifles modified to post ban configuration by the bayonet lug being ground down, some not all had muzzle nuts tack welded on, and thumbhole stocks attached. The fixed stock model had the number 7 stamped on each side of the model number 56S.

The under folding stock rifles had a tang welded on the back of the receiver and a thumbhole stock added. They had a 1 stamped in front of the 56S-1 model number.

ACC/Intrac MAK-90 rifles

As you can see from the picture ACC/Intrac did import a small number of MAK-90 rifles. Until a fellow AK-47.net member sent me these pictures I had only seen Romanian and Egyptian rifles that were imported by ACC/Intrac. They have 16″ barrels with the threads turned off.

Compasseco MAK-90 Rifles

Compasseco Inc. is a big importer of Chinese air rifles/pistols. They imported some stamped receiver MAK-90 Sporter rifles in 1994. They have square cut receivers and unthreaded barrels. They have Chinese light colored thumbhole stocks.

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How to change handguards on AK47 type rifles

After removing the bolt carrier from the rifle…
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
How to change handguards on AK rifles

TOOLS NEEDED: Vise or Quick Clamp,hammer,rubber/wood/rawhide mallet,screwdriver,punch,adjustable wrench,padding for vise jaws(old leather belt,rubber,rags,etc..).

After removing the bolt carrier from the rifle, look on the right side of the rifle below the rear sight. There you will see a lever,move it up and you will notice it turns the gas tube retaining pin.

It has a flat side on it that once it is lined up and down the gas tube can be removed from the rifle by pulling up on the back end of it. Here is the lever in the correct position to remove the upper handguard.

As you can see from the above pic that the gas tube is larger on the rear end and has a flat on each side. Notice the retainers that hold the wood on are open on the bottom. Once the wood is rotated 180 degrees on the gas tube it can be pulled off.

There are 3 ways to get the wood off the gas tube.

Put the rear of the gas tube into a vise with the gas tube upright in the vise,clamping on the flats on each side of the rear of the gas tube. Then with your hand rotate the wood 180 degrees and pull it off.

Clamp the wood side ways in the vise. Then use the adjustable wrench to turn the gas tube 180 degrees and pull it off the wood.

If you don’t have a vise hold the wood in one hand and use the adjustable wrench to turn the gas tube 180 degrees and pull them apart.

Reverse the above process to apply the new upper handguard to the gas tube. I have found in changing the handguards on a couple of dozen AK type rifles that using ways #1 and # 3 will work 95% of the time.

A Quick Clamp can be used in place of a vise to hold the gas tube.

Changing the lower handguard:

Notice in the pic below the small lever on the right front of the lower handguard.

It is connected to a pin on the metal lower handguard retainer. The pin is flat on one side so the lever must be upright or all the way foreword to allow the retainer to slide foreword on the barrel. Use a screwdriver to pry the lever up. Some retainers are pretty tight on the barrel and might require being tapped with punch/hammer to get them to start moving. Once the retainer is pushed foreword on the barrel till it is stopped by the gas block on the barrel. Then the lower handguard can be pulled forward and off the rifle. The lower handguard has a tang of wood that goes into the front of the receiver. Some rifles lower handguards have a metal spacer that attaches to the wood tang. So you don’t want to do any up/down,side to side pulling on the lower handguard. I have found that holding the lower handguard with one hand and hitting the rear sight block with a rubber mallet will remove it easily. Once the handguard is replaced slide the metal retainer on to the wood and rotate the lever into the down position.

 

Some lower and upper handguards will be loose after changing out the wood. 1/8″wide x 1″long strips can be cut from a coke can or tin can depending on low loose they are and inserted between the retainers and wood.

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How to load a 75rd and 100rd AK47drum

The 7.62x39mm drums for AK type rifles were made in 75rd and 100rd versions. The only difference between them besides capacity is …
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
How to load a 75rd and 100rd AK47drum

Chinese drums

The 7.62x39mm drums for AK type rifles were made in 75rd and 100rd versions. The only difference between them besides capacity is the 100rd drum is larger in diameter. Both have the same controls,are loaded and function the same way. A 75rd drum is used in all pics but the 100rd drum is loaded exactly the same way. The first thing is to open the latches on either side of the feed tower and open the cover on the back of the drum. The whole “trick” to get them to function 100% is to have the follower in the correct position before loading any cartridges into the drum. In the pic below the point of the knife is pointing to the follower.

At this point press the button in the center of the drum. This releases the spring pressure so make sure all your fingers are clear of the cartridge (this is the part that surrounds the spring release button that has all the cutouts in it for the ammo).

WARNING
The cartridge will spin around very fast and cut the crap out of any part of your fingers it hits. Been there done this and the cartridge of the first drum I bought has some slight stains/pitting in a couple of spots from my bloody index finger.

Once the spring pressure has been released hold the spring release button down and spin the cartridge clockwise till it stops. It should be in this position just like in the pic below.

The 7.62x39mm drums for AK type rifles were made in 75rd and 100rd versions. The only difference between them besides capacity is the 100rd drum is larger in diameter. Both have the same controls,are loaded and function the same way. A 75rd drum is used in all pics but the 100rd drum is loaded exactly the same way. The first thing is to open the latches on either side of the feed tower and open the cover on the back of the drum. The whole

The drum is now ready for loading. Insert the ammo nose down into all the slots and holes in the cartridge. Below is a pic of a partly loaded drum note that the top slots will not hold 6 rds like all the others. Single rds are put into the holes on the outer edge of the cartridge.

Once all the slots and holes have been filled with ammo the drum is ready to go just close the lid,lock the latches. The loaded drum can be stored loaded with no pressure on the spring. To use the drum just wind the key on the back of the drum 4 or 5 turns,and the drum is ready to be inserted into your rifle and fired.

At this point you are saying to yourself Hey,Whoa bogus instructions man! I counted the number of rds in the drum and it is not 75. Well you are right it is not,but to get 75 rds into the drum you need to insert them into the feed tower one at a time or wind the drum up. Then release the spring pressure and carefully rotate the cartridge clockwise and fill up the empty holes with ammo. Watch the ammo in the feed tower as it will fall back into the drum hanging up the cartridge if you are not careful. But…. the feed tower has a spring on the inside of it that when the drum is loaded with 75rds is compressed. The whole idea of the Chinese drum being better for long term storage than the Russian ones is that it can be stored loaded without any spring being compressed i.e. no stress on the parts. So I fill up my drums with only as much ammo as the cartridge will hold and not 75rds so as not to stress the spring in the feed tower.

As far as maintenance and cleaning goes I have fired my 9-75rd and 3-100rd drums at least 5 times each and some 10+ times without cleaning except one. I dropped it in the dirt with it open. So I used a can of brake parts cleaner to hose it out and a pump spray bottle of CLP to re lube the inside. All my drums have been 100% reliable.

RUSSIAN DRUMS

They are loaded by pressing the loading lever on the back of the drum and inserting one cartridge. Then repeating this 74 more times till it is fully loaded and man is it a bitch. They work 100% but give you a sore red thumb. They are great collector items but get a Chinese drum for shooting. Besides loading them the really downside is that the spring is under constant pressure when loaded unlike the Chinese drums.

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AK47 drum and magazine overview

The 2 types of drums imported for use in AK47 rifles that are chambered for the 7.62x39mm cartridge are the Chinese type and the Russian type. The Chinese type drums are easy to spot …
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
AK47 drum and magazine overview

Drums

The 2 types of drums imported for use in AK-47 rifles that are chambered for the 7.62x39mm cartridge are the Chinese type and the Russian type. The Chinese type drums are easy to spot as the feed tower that is inserted into the magazine well of the rifle is about 90 degrees perpendicular to the body of the drum

When the drum is inserted into a rifle it hangs straight down. These drums also have 2 clasps that hold the hinged rear cover on the drum.

All Chinese drums come with a carry handle? I use the handle to tie the drum pouch to the drum.

There were 2 sizes of Chinese drums imported the 75 round and the 100 round. All the parts are the same on both drums except the 100 round is just larger. Loading and function are the same for both sizes.

The 100 round drums are unmarked and have the same style winding key as the 36 in a triangle marked 75 round drums.

Chinese drum markings

There are 2 types of markings on the 75 round drums. A 36 in a triangle and a 9396 in a oval. I have measured the parts of both types of drums and they are identical. The only difference besides the markings is the winding key on the 9396 in a oval drums has a elongated oval cut out in it.

Russian type drums

Russian type drums were produced in Russia and several of the Russian satellite countries. They don’t have the back that opens up, but must be loaded by inserting one round at a time while pushing the loading lever each time.

In this picture you can see the difference in the angle of the feed towers. The Russian drum is on the left and the Chinese on the right. When inserted into a rifle the Russian drum angles foreword and the Chinese pretty much hangs down straight.

Magazines

Magazines were produced in many countries and with capacities from 5-55 rounds. There are larger capacity ones produced but they were experimental or custom made not standard production. This page will cover the common magazines imported by country. As with drums there are basically two types Chinese and Russian patterns. The pic below there is a one of each and they can be distinguished by the Russian pattern having a rib down the back (right one) and the Chinese (left one) doesn’t. Also notice the different type of reinforcing ribs on the bottom sides of the mags. Measuring both types with calipers the thickness of the metal in the different parts of the mags is the same. The mag bodies are made of two stamped pieces spot welded together. The front of both pattern mags are folded over each other then spot welded as is the back of the Chinese mag also done this way. The Russian mag has the back of the two mag halves folded out then spot welded forming the rib you see in the pic.

Chinese

Chinese magazines were imported in 2 calibers 7.62x39mm and 5.56x45mm/223 Remington. 7.62x39mm mags were imported with capacities of 5,10,20,30,and 40 rounds. 5.56x45mm mags were imported in 10 and 30 rounds. Here is a pic of a 30rd 7.62 and a 30rd 5.56 mag. Notice how the curve of the 7.62 mag is greater than the 5.56. This is because the taper of the 7.62 cartridges from the back to the front is greater than the 5.56 cartridge and the curve is needed so it will feed smoothly from the mag.

10rd 7.62 on the left and 10rd 5.56 on the right.

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AK47 ammo identification

The 7.62x39mm cartridge was invented by the Russians and adopted as the M-43 cartridge in 1943. The cartridge was developed in response to..
From the J.A.Freeman AK47 / AK74 Website
AK rifle ammo identification

7.62x39mm

The 7.62x39mm cartridge was invented by the Russians and adopted as the M-43 cartridge in 1943. The cartridge was developed in response to getting there ass's kicked by the Germans with their new Mkb-42 assault rifle that fired the 7.92x33mm cartridge from it's 30rd mag. Latter in 1944 the German developed the Stg-44 which used stamped sheet metal receiver and 30rd mag. The Stg stands for Sturmgewher which translates to Assault Rifle. The first rifle the Russians designed to fire the new cartridge was the SKS-45 adopted in 1945. The 10 shot fixed mag of the SKS just didn't cut it and the AK-47 that used a 30rd mag was adopted in 1947.

The 7.62x39mm cartridge was invented by the Russians and adopted as the M-43 cartridge in 1943. The cartridge was developed in response to getting there ass’s kicked by the Germans with their new Mkb-42 assault rifle that fired the 7.92x33mm cartridge from it’s 30rd mag. Latter in 1944 the German developed the Stg-44 which used stamped sheet metal receiver and 30rd mag. The Stg stands for Sturmgewher which translates to Assault Rifle. The first rifle the Russians designed to fire the new cartridge was the SKS-45 adopted in 1945. The 10 shot fixed mag of the SKS just didn’t cut it and the AK-47 that used a 30rd mag was adopted in 1947.

Chinese 7.62x39mm

Ammo

The Chinese leader Chairman Mao Tse-dong formed very close ties to the Russians in the early 1950′s. This resulted in lots of aid from the Russians. Some of the aid was the boxing up of the machinery of whole factories to produce the SKS and AK-47 rifles. The Russians supplied the machinery and technicians to set the factories up. The SKS,AK-47,and the 7.62x39mm cartridge were adopted by the Chinese in 1956. This resulted in both rifles and the cartridge being called the type-56 for year of adoption. Chinese steel core ammo was banned by the BATF in a letter to FFL dealers and importers in Febuary,1994. All Chinese ammo was imported till May of 1994 when Pres. Clinton sent a letter to the BATF outlawing imports of Chinese ammo and guns.

The first 7.62x39mm ammo imported to the USA was military surplus. It was packed in 2 sealed metal tins per wooden case. The ammo for the SKS rifle was packed in 550 rounds per tin,1100 rounds per wooden case. It was on 10rd stripper clips with 2 or 3 stripper clips per 20rd or 30rd paper wrapped bundle. Some were tied with string and some not.

All ammo packed in the paper wrapped bundles has steel core bullets.

The Chinese surplus ammo was also packed in 20 round paper wrapped bundles tied with string in tins of 700 or 720. Wooden cases of 1400 or 1440.

Here is a pic of the headstamps of Chinese ammo. The top number is the number of the factory that produced the ammo. The bottom number is the year of production.

Here is a pic of the headstamps of Chinese ammo. The top number is the number of the factory that produced the ammo. The bottom number is the year of production.

Here is a pic of the earliest and latest dated Chinese ammo imported to the US.

How to tell if your ammo has steel core bullets

The cartridge in the center has a steel core bullet. The others on either side have lead core bullets except the one on the right that is a experimental round that has plastic beads in the nose and a lead core.

You can’t use a magnet to check if your ammo has steel core bullets!

All Chinese ammo uses bullets made with copper plated steel jackets, So using a magnet is useless because it will be sticking to the steel bullet jacket and not the steel core. The only way to tell if your ammo is steel core is to pull a bullet. Steel core bullets are over 1″ long, have a boat tail, and have black sealer on them. In the pic the steel core bullet is on the left and the lead core on the right.

Only Chinese factories 31, 71, 311 and 351 made lead core ball. (maybe 61 also, but not sure)

Any other Chinese factory code will be steel core.
Lead core ball from 31 ALWAYS has a green case mouth seal.
Lead core ball from 71 ALWAYS has a knurled crimping groove on the projectile.
Lead core ball from 311 and 351 is harder to tell, but generally the rounds have NO case mouth seal or primer seal and date from 1991-1994
The earliest known lead core from 31 is 1990 dated.
The earliest known lead core from 71 is 1988 dated.

Commercial Packaged Ammo

All the commercial ammo was packed in the same style wooden crates as the surplus ammo. The first commercial ammo I saw was the green box Norinco that was packed 20rds per box,600rds per tin, and 2 tins per wooden case of 1200rds. Afterwards all the ammo was packed 60-20rd boxes per wooden case and all the boxes were wrapped in one large clear plastic bag.

5.56x45mm

Chinese 223 Remington ammo mfg. by Norinco was imported in 20 rd yellow boxes with a Styrofoam insert. It was brass cased, boxer primed, with a 55 grain fmj bullet. The headstamp is a C at 10 o’clock, a J at 2 o’clock, and a single digit for year of mfg. at 6 o’clock.

This ammo came packed 60- 20 round boxes per 1200 round wooden case. Having shot and reloaded the cases several times I can say that it is pretty good ammo.

Chinese military surplus ammo was imported in 7.62x25mm,9x18mm Makarov, 7.62x39mm, and 7.62x54R mm. Commercial packaged ammo was imported in 7.62x25mm, 9x18mm Makarov, 9x19mm, 45acp, 5.56x45mm / 223 Remington, 30 Carbine, 7.62x39mm, 7.62x51mm / 308 Winchester, and 7.62x54R. The Chinese 30 Carbine ammo was pretty interesting as it had the same headstamp as US military ammunition made at the Lake City Ammunition Plant in 1952. That is “L C 52″.

Russian Ammo

Small quantities of Russian ammo was imported from other countries but was in small amounts intended for the cartridge collector market or mislabeled as to country of mfg. Until the fall of the Soviet Union all arms and ammo were banned from import to the US by law. A large amount of Russian steel core 7.62x39mm ammo was imported in late 1993/early 1994 but due to the BATF re-classifying 7.62x39mm steel core ammo as armor piercing ammo in February 1994. The import or sale of 7.62x39mm ammo with steel core bullets by FFL holders was banned to anyone one but military, law enforcement, or other govt. agencies. So very little of it made it into the hands of shooters or collectors. As you can see in the picture below it came in unmarked 20rd boxes.

The re-classifying of steel core ammo put a stop to the import of Russian 7.62x39mm ammo till 1995 when a large amount of ammo was imported from Germany. In Germany stocks of former East German steel core ammo from Russia, Romania, and East Germany had the bullets pulled and lead core bullets seated in the cases so it could be imported to the USA. This ammo even though new bullets were used the cases still had the corrosive primers in them. So make sure to clean your rifle thoroughly. The banning of steel core ammo in February 1994 and the banning of all Chinese ammo imports in April 1994 resulted in the price of a case of 7.62x39mm going up to over 3 times the price it was before the 1994 ammo import bans. The import of the large quantity of the re-bulleted German ammo resulted in the price dropping from over $300 per case to a little under $200 a couple months after it was first imported. In 1997 imports of new production Russian 7.62x39mm ammo with lead core bullets started coming into the US and case prices started dropping. The first was packed in plain white boxes with black printing. In this pic the box is unfolded so all the printing can be seen but it is the standard style 20rd box that all 7.62x39mm Russian ammo comes in.

The first Russian ammo for AK rifles imported in shooting quantities was imported by Intrac Arms International LLC and was 5.45x39mm. It was imported in 1997 along with the first AK rifles imported chambered for the 5.45x39mm cartridge the Romanian CUR-2. This ammo had lacquered steel cases loaded with a 70 grain lead core fmj bullet. The headstamp is a 3 over 96 denoting mfg. by Ulyanovsk in 1996. It was packed in 30rd paper wrapped bundles with paper separators in each bundle and the bundle was stapled on both ends. There were 36-30 round bundles per sealed tin of 1080 rounds. Two tins per wooden case of 2160 rounds. Each case came with a tool to open the tins in a cut out in the inside of one side of the wooden case’s wall.

This ammo has corrosive primers which can be noted by the color of the primer. Notice they are gunmetal grey and not the gold color of non corrosive primers in current imported Russian ammo.

Headstamps

USSR / Russia Mfg. codes 5.45×39, 7.62×39 and 7.62x54r

3 = Ulyanovsk
7 = Amursk (Vympel)
17 = Barnaul
60 = Frunze
270 = Voroshilovgrad
539 = Tula
711 = Klimovsk
188 = Novosibirsk

Along with the numbers there are also letters and symbols used on Russian commercial ammo. The pic below the headstamps of Ulyanovsk ammo has the two arrows in the circle like on the box. The Barnaul uses the square with the letters in it like on the box. The unmarked box on the right is Klimovsk and the top symbol is used on the headstamps of cartridges mfg. by them.

Tula Cartridge Works produced ammo at first with a TCW headstamp which later became the WOLF brand of ammo. Early imports of Tula ammo came in white boxes with black printing. Early imports of Wolf ammo had TCW headstamps even though they were packed in Wolf brand boxes. Now all the Wolf brand ammo has a WOLF headstamp.

Tula Cartridge Works produced ammo at first with a TCW headstamp which later became the WOLF brand of ammo. Early imports of Tula ammo came in white boxes with black printing. Early imports of Wolf ammo had TCW headstamps even though they were packed in Wolf brand boxes. Now all the Wolf brand ammo has a WOLF headstamp.

As you can see from the pic below the Russians have remained with the same design 20rd box but the graphics have improved over the years. A plain unprinted box imported in 1997,1998 printed box,1999 graphics,1999 colored box,2001,and 2004 boxes on the right with photo quality graphics.

As you can see from the pic below the Russians have remained with the same design 20rd box but the graphics have improved over the years. A plain unprinted box imported in 1997,1998 printed box,1999 graphics,1999 colored box,2001,and 2004 boxes on the right with photo quality graphics.

Currently there is rifle ammo being imported from 4 Russian ammo factories Ulyanovsk, Vympel, Barnaul, and Tula. The Klimovsk factory stopped producing ammo as the last imported was in 2002. Some factories produce ammo under their brand and other brands. Ulyanovsk produces ammo in the blue and white boxes under their name and also the Sapsan brand of ammo.

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Barnaul produces ammo under the Barnaul, Monarch, and RAM brands. The RAM stands for Russian Ammunition Manufacturing.

Tula produces only the Wolf brand of ammo and Vympel only produces Golden Tiger brand ammo.

The Bear brands of Russian Ammo

Currently there are 3 types of “Bear” rifle ammo imported the Silver Bear, Brown Bear, and Golden Bear. The different colors in the name of the “Bear” ammo denote the type of finish applied to the steel cases.

Silver = zinc plated

Brown = brown lacquer

Golden = brass plated

The Bear ammo is imported with soft point, hollow point, or full metal jacket bullets. The Silver Bear ammo was imported with two types of fmj bullets. The first type of Bear ammo imported was the Silver Bear in 2000 that was made by Klimovsk with a standard fmj bullet. Later the “match” Silver Bear ammo was imported made by Ulyanovsk with a fmj bullet with a nipple on the tip.

The next type ammo imported was the Brown Bear in 2001 and the Golden Bear in 2004. The Silver Bear and Brown Bear ammo imported before 2004 could be mfg. by Barnaul, Ulyanovsk, or Klimovsk. Ordering a case of Bear ammo was a toss up as to which company made the ammo You had to look on the box once you got it to see which company made it except the Match Silver Bear which has only been made by Ulyanovsk. For details on what cartridges and bullet types are available go to the importers website at

 Bear ammo website

The Russian ammunition manufacturers websites:

East Germany

After the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945 the country was separated into two Germanys. The eastern half was controlled by Russia and the western half by the USA, Britain, and France. The eastern half was called the Soviet zone of occupation till 1949 a government organized by the Soviets named the country Deutschland Democratic Republic. The DDR was controlled by the Soviets so the DDR army adopted Soviet military arms and tactics. Due to political and economic forces the Soviet govt. collapsed in 1989 as did the governments of most of the eastern European countries controlled by the Soviets. East and West Germany were reunited into one government in 1991. With West Germany having been a North Atlantic Treaty Origination=NATO member since 1955 all DDR military equipment was incompatible with NATO equipment so was sold off as military surplus.

The First 7.62×39 ammo imported.

In 1992 Century Arms imported 15 million rounds of DDR 7.62x39mm M43 ammo which has steel core bullets. This ammo was not in boxes but sold loose in 1000 rd lots. It had headstamps of DDR ammo factory codes of 04 and 05. The two digit dates of the headstamps were in the 1960′s to 1980′s. This ammo had a grey lacquer finish on the cases and was corrosive primed.

Later Century Arms imported some DDR ammo in boxes.

Besides the M43 ammo blanks and practice ammo was imported. The practice ammo was sold by Century Arms in 1000 rd lots that came packed loose, in 20rd boxes, or in 10rd blister packs. The bullet was a copper plated steel jacket that had a plastic core that weighted 63 grains. It works well in AK rifles but is iffy functioning in SKS rifles. In the pic blanks, plastic core in the blister pack and box.

After the 1994 reclassification of steel core 7.62x39mm by the BATF as armor piercing ammo millions of rounds of M43 ammo was remanufactured in the former DDR. This ammo was of DDR and Hungarian mfg. denoted by the 04,05,and 22 factory codes of the headstamps. The M43 bullets were pulled a new mfg. lead core bullets were seated in the cases. It was imported in late 1994 and 1995. While legal to import with the lead core bullets all this ammo still had the corrosive primers in it. It was packed in white 20rd boxes with black printing and sold in 1000 rd cases. It was the first ammo to come in after the ban on Chinese guns and ammo that made the price of 7.62x39mm ammo rise to over $300 per case. All ammo from East Germany is corrosive primed. So make sure to clean your rifle as soon as possible after firing it.

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Mini – Shorty AK47 pistol

  • Close Up Pics of the Mini AK47 Pistol
  • Compared with the SAR-1
  • At the range – Shooting the Mini AK47 pistol
  • Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol Compared with a
  • Horns Custom “Standard Size” AK47 Tactical Pistol
  • Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol with bayonets
  • We review the new Ewbank Mini – Shorty AK47 pistol.
  • The smallest most reliable AK47 micro pistol on the planet.

We recently had the chance to review and shoot a custom built AK47 pistol built by Ken Ewbank of Ewbank Mfg in Winslow, Arizona USA. This is a real head turner, it’ll loud and accurate, fun to shoot and it attracts quite a crowd.

I’ve known Ken for about a year now and when we’ve talked the topic inevitably turns to the new projects he’s got on the custom table. But let me pause,

If you don’t know Ken, he’s the owner of Ewbank Manufacturing, Ken has been one of if not the largest manufacturers of mid range US built AK47 rifles, Ak47 pistols and AK47 receivers for years now. Ken’s shop handles production runs from dozens to hundreds of rifles and pistols to many of the major distributors, military and law enforcement all over the country.

Ken is not doing this just for the money, he is an AK nut, like many of us he’s happy to sit and build elaborate and detailed historic recreations and custom US versions of our favorite rifle. Ken takes some time here and there from running the production line to work on new ideas, custom jobs, and such.

He lets us know when something new is done or when an especially fancy custom job is finished so we can post pictures on our websites. And when Ken sent us a picture of one of his newest creations I placed an order that day. I know other people did too. But having a website to publish photos and reviews on has it’s perks and I received my new AK47 pistol at the Phoenix Gun Show this weekend. About two weeks later maybe three.

The following pictures should give you a pretty good idea of what this pistol looks like and we are editing a small video to show you how surprisingly accurate these tiny AK47s shoot.

We are not trying to say one of these AK47 rifles is better then the other, just to let everyone who might not otherwise see both laying next to each other see the differences and similarities between these two rifles.

Ewbank Custom Mini AK47 Pistol with Chinese Bayonet

Receiver: Ewbanks Gen 2
Parts: Mostly Romanian and some US parts. Most parts are highly modified
Cal: 7.62X39
Finish : Parkerized
Retail Price: $1199.99

Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol Compared with the SAR-1

Here are the Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol and the SAR-1 next to each other. The size difference is very apparent, the pistol looses over 3 pounds of metal and wood from the rifle

Back to back with the receivers lined up for another perspective on the scale of this mini AK47 pistol

With the Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol with no stock (obviously) and the SAR-1next to each other, it’s obvious where a lot of the weight was.

The front end is highly modified. This was no hacksaw and grinder job that took ten minutes. This conversation took some clever engineering. It’s a unique design. The parts all fit together perfectly, there are no gaps or tool marks on this pistol.

The elements are all there, just closer together. It’s not as simple as it looks once you start to think about the various parts moving inside the AK47. The obvious items like the gas tube, barrel and handguards were simply a step in the process. Calculations needed to take into effect the pressure of the gasses that cycle the action when they are drawn from the barrel sooner than normal. Then that pressure needed to be regulated to provide enough with out too much pressure to the modified bolt carrier.

But the elements of the AK47 remain, the signature front sight post and exposed gas block and gas tube are all still there, just shortened and molded into a one handed version of the AK47

The AK47 pistol uses standard AK47 magazines

Once field stripped it’s easy to see how many parts are modified and altered to make this pistol. Again all the parts are there, just refined to make the same operation happen with less space to work in.


Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol Compared with a
Horns Custom “Standard Size” AK47 Tactical Pistol

AK47 pistols are not brand new. They first hit the market a few years back and Ken has been one of the leading AK47 and AK47 pistols all that time. As one of the first large manufacturers of AK47 pistols, Ken has helped shape the style of Ak47 pistols on the market today. Chris Horn of Horn’s Custom Rifles has been building Ak47 pistols almost as long. Chris builds his pistols for the military and law enforcement market and they prefer the ‘Tactical’ styles like our sample here.

The Horn Ak47 pistol is built from AMD-65 parts so it’s barrel is the standard 14″ It has standard size AK47 front grips this one has built in rails for mounting optics

Back to back with the receivers lined up for another perspective on the scale of the mini AK47 pistol

The front ends of the two AK47 pistols

Another shot that just looks cool


Here it is with a Ewbank Mini Krink Pistol

I snapped this one when I picked it up. It’s the little cousin made with Krink parts, a few inches shorter than mine if you can believe it.


Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol with bayonets

Now the best part.. Bayonets

a Red Chinese Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol

An AK47 pistol with a bayonet, this is the perk of my job. I like to think I’m the first one in history to have commissioned an AK47 pistol with a bayonet. I couldn’t be prouder.

a Bulgarian Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol

Another Chinese Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol, this one is black

a Polish Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol

a North Korean Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol

OK I think this might be German, or another black Chinese Bayonet on the Mini AK47 pistol I need to wait till it’s posted to see it bigger

Here is a Horns Custom Rifle’s Fake AK47 Suppressor on the Mini AK47 pistol. This would be a great safety feature for bump firing I bet

At the range – Shooting the Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol

Sure we can all see what it looks like already, but HOW DOES IT SHOOT??

We took it out to shoot it at South East Regional Park (SERP) in Tucson, AZ. We shot about a hundred rounds, passing it around to let a variety of shooters give it a try. Most were similing or laughing when they finished all had nothing but good things to say about it. I wasn’t selling them or asking for quotes for this article, I was simply asking their opinion of it.

This little guy is loud don’t assume it’s quiet because it’s small. It quickly gets the attention of the shooters with it’s bark. Because the barrel is so short, the powder that would normally be burning inside the barrel comes out the barrel on fire, so you get these massive clouds of flame that bellow out the barrel slow enough to be seen easily in bright Arizona sunlight.

We shot it at the berm on the pistol side of the range this is about 60 yards from the firing line. All the testers were able to pick rocks and hit them while aiming. From the hip, which everyone preferred, most were able to walk the shots in on their target easily

Video of the day at the range on the way

Close Up Pics of the Ewbank Mini AK47 Pistol

The classic side angle mug shot of the Mini AK47 pistol. It’s very well built. Ken knows how to build an AK47 and when he has the time to build a custom gun like this by hand you can see his expertise in the fine details and quality

At under 7 pounds it’s not hard to hold with one hand

Like a fine automobile, yacht or aircraft there is no detail left untouched. Either Ken found a pristine parts kit or he took the time to clean up tool marks and any flaws all over this pistol, even on the inside which is rarely seen

The rivets on this AK47 pistol are uniform balanced and as close to perfect as I’ve seen on any guns. At $1200 these are not going to be a persons first AK47.

But if you are like me, totally nuts over this interesting and historic rifle, this pistol is a true work of American art.

Like a custom Harley these pistols are unique, tough looking, loud and just plain cool.

I can’t help but think when I look at it .. are there Russian website guys building websites reviewing the mini AR-15 pistols the Russian manufacturers there are making?

This little guy is loud don't assume it's quiet because it's small. It quickly gets the attention of the shooters with it's bark. Because the barrel is so short, the powder that would normally be burning inside the barrel comes out the barrel on fire, so you get these massive clouds of flame that bellow out the barrel slow enough to be seen easily in bright Arizona sunlight.

Egyptian Maadi AK47 Bayonet

Egyptian Maadi AK47 Bayonets are rare and a cool item for a AK47 bayonet collection. They are a type 2 version in a brown color that is unique. They are strong and built well. They are hard to find, in my opinion as a collector it’s just under the KM87 as far as difficulty finding and in cost.

The Egyptian Maadi AK47 Bayonet

Here’s a mock up of a German MPi-KM Folder mixed with the MPi-KM.
This one is made on an imported Egyptian Maadi with US parts and Egyptian bayonet.
Although this rifle was imported with no bayonet lug, you can’t tell in the pictures.

German MPi-KM Folder

and here’s the MPI-KM

Even with no lugs the bayonet fits into place.
If it was picked up the bayonet would fall right off… what a shame

Looking at the metal & finish of the Maadi and the Egyptian bayonet you can see the similarities. Well, OK more in real life than in the pictures perhaps. Both are very solid and well built.

Three Egyptian bayonets in great condition. These seem to be unused / un issued.
No marks, no scrapes nor dents or dings The leather and rubber are in perfect condition.

From the back the brass rivets are visable with some paint on them, not rust. The leather is in perfect unused condition. Unused leather on the correct type (not from a different bayonet) is a good indication of an umused bayonet as the leather wears out faster than just about any other part of the bayonet.

The serial numbers match on the bayonet and the scabbards.
The rubber is another indication of the amount of use the bayonet has seen

Very little markings other than what’s happened in shipping over the years
is visible on the soft plastic grips

The canvas strap is still in new condition and the correct type for this style Ak47 bayonet. Another indication of the quality of these bayonets.

The leather on the Egyptian AK47 bayonet is long enough to wrap easily around the canvas strap. This is not the same on many other versions of the Ak47 bayonets.

This shot is supposed to show the matching serial numbers
on the crossguard and the scabbard, but it is a cool looking shot on it’s own

So here’s your matching serial numbers

Pictures like this get taken just to piss off other collectors
If only they were consecutive numbers…

Couple more shots of the Egyptian AK47 bayonet on a Maadi

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AK47 Bolt Hold Open Safety Mod

One of the cool tricks Chris Horn of Horns Custom Rifles does to his custom AK47 builds. Be sure to watch the video to see it in action
AK47 Bolt Hold Open Safety Mod

One of the things about using an AK47 at a public shooting range is it’s lack of a bolt hold open. Most ranges require all rifles to be opened and unloaded during a cease fire, and typically the only option for an AK47 shooter is to hold the bolt back with a spent round or plastic chamber block. Chris devised a simple modification to the AK47 safety lever that will allow the bolt to safely stay back with the chamber open and visible.

This means you can step away from your rifle on a range and the line safety guys can see that your AK47 is unloaded easily.

One of the things about using an AK47 at a public shooting range is it's lack of a bolt hold open. Most ranges require all rifles to be opened and unloaded during a cease fire, and typically the only option for an AK47 shooter is to hold the bolt back with a spent round or plastic chamber block. Chris devised a simple modification to the AK47 safety lever that will allow the bolt to safely stay back with the chamber open and visible.

Bolt in the ‘open’ position using the modified AK47 safety lever

Another feature of the modified AK47 safety lever is the 'quick release' found in other rifles that have a bolt hold open feature. You can load a full magazine, and simply drop the safety then you are ready to shoot in almost no time

Bolt closed and the modified AK47 safety lever in the open to see

Another feature of the modified AK47 safety lever is the ‘quick release’ found in other rifles that have a bolt hold open feature. You can load a full magazine, and simply drop the safety then you are ready to shoot in almost no time

75 Round Ak47 Drum Magazine Instructions

Many people own these but few have the instructions.
75 Round Magazine Instructions

The Chinese drum fits any AK47 (7.62x39) style rifle that uses double stack magazines. You open the door of the magazine, load 75 rounds of ammo, close the door and wind up the spring. This system allows you to store ammo in the magazine. Load it, don't wind it until you need it. No springs to weaken during storage.

The Chinese drum fits any AK47 (7.62×39) style rifle that uses double stack magazines. You open the door of the magazine, load 75 rounds of ammo, close the door and wind up the spring. This system allows you to store ammo in the magazine. Load it, then don’t wind it. So no springs weaken during storage.

TO LOAD MAGAZINE

  • Unlatch and open the rear cover. Depress the spring loaded button in the center of the drum and turn the spindle clockwise until the magazine follower is returned to the beginning of the spiral track.
  • Insert five (5) rounds into the slots located nearest the top (column) section of the magazine.
  • With five rounds loaded, hold the spindle firmly in place with one hand. With the other hand, wind the spring tensioning key (located under the spring loaded button) CLOCKWISE three (3) clicks.

CAUTION: Hold the spindle securely while applying tension in order to prevent it from slipping and catching your fingers.
With the spring tensioned, quickly release the spindle. The five rounds loaded previously will be pushed to the top of the magazine, and the last round will hold the spindle in place.
At this point you have the option as to how to load the magazine. If cartridges are dropped in the remaining slots, the total magazine capacity will be seventy three (73) rounds. Alternately, if the procedure described as follows is used, the total capacity will be seventy five (75) rounds.

A.) Tilt the column portion of the drum at a slight downward angle and turn the spindle clockwise just slightly. Remove the last two rounds.

B.) Keep the drum tilted downwards, and rotate the spindle so that the follower is returned to the beginning of the spiral track (as in step 1).

C.) Insert two rounds in the top section and release the spindle. Complete loading the magazine by dropping cartridges into the remaining slots.

WARNING: THE ABOVE PROCEDURES SHOULD ONLY BE USED WHEN LOADING THE MAGAZINE TO ITS FULL CAPACITY OF 73 OR 75 ROUNDS. IF THE USER INTENDS TO LOAD ONLY A PARTIAL MAGAZINE, THEN THE MAGAZINE FOLLOWER MUST BE DIRECTLY BEHIND THE LAST CARTRIDGE. IF THERE IS A GAP BETWEEN THE LAST CARTRIDGE AND THE MAGAZINE FOLLOWER, THE DRUM MAY BE DAMAGED DURING FIRING.
With the drum fully loaded, close the rear cover and secure with both latches. Wind the mainspring with the key located on the rear cover. Wind the key seven (7) revolutions (360 degrees). If the magazine is loaded to only thirty (30) rounds, then the tension should be reduced to five (5) revolutions. DO NOT EXCEED THE RECOMMENDED NUMBER OF REVOLUTIONS AS THIS WILL CAUSE UNDUE WEAR OR BREAKAGE TO THE MAINSPRING.
With step six completed, the magazine is ready to use.

Romanian 7.62×39
75 round Drum Magazine
Loading & Unloading
74.6 kb

DURING PROLONGED PERIODS OF STORAGE:

Open the rear cover and depress the spring loaded button at the center of the drum. Do not tilt the drum, as the cartridges might fall out. Close and latch the back cover and re-tension the spring three (3) clicks. The drum magazine can be stored in this manner indefinitely.

TO UNLOAD THE MAGAZINE:

Open the rear cover and depress the spring loaded button at the center of the drum. Dump the cartridges out. The rounds in the column will need to be removed individually.

MAINTENANCE OF THE MAGAZINE:

Periodically, the magazine should be cleaned with solvent to prevent the build-up of unburned powder and grit in the spiral track. A significant amount of residue in the track may hinder the functioning of the drum.

To disassemble the drum magazine, open the real cover and depress the spring loaded button. Turn the spring tensioning key COUNTER-CLOCKWISE and remove it. Next, lift the spindle out of the magazine. DO NOT DISASSEMBLE THE MAGAZINE ANY FURTHER.